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Posts Tagged ‘library of congress’

BLUEBERRY SAUCE

This blueberry sauce is fantastic on ice cream or pancakes, or whatever you might want to pour it over.

Tent of Indian blueberry picker. Littlefork, Minnesota Russell Lee, photographer August 1937

3 tablespoons lemon juice

3 tablespoons grated orange rind

1 1/2 cups fresh orange juice

4 1/2 cups sugar

3 quarts blueberries

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon powdered cloves or nutmeg

1/4 cup liquid pectin

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Sterilize 6 pint jars or 12 1/2 pint jars, and lids.

Stir the lemon juice, orange rind, orange juice and sugar in a large pot, bring to a rolling boil.

Add berries and bring to a full boil again.

Add cinnamon, cloves/nutmeg and pectin, and boil hard, stirring constantly, for 1 minute.  Remove from heat, pour into hot, sterilized jars and seal.

Makes about 6 pints.

Originally from House & Garden, August 1962

 

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Portrait of Louis Jordan, Paramount Theater(?), New York, N.Y., ca. July 1946. William P. Gottlieb,photographer.

The Library of Congress is now on Flickr!

Thanks for the tip, The Online Photographer!

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New York City W.P.A. Art Project.  Date stamped on verso: Mar 24 1941.  Aida McKenzie, artist.  (Library of Congress)

New York City W.P.A. Art Project. Date stamped on verso: Mar 24 1941. Aida McKenzie, artist. (Library of Congress)

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Steamboats Are Ruining Everything has an interesting article about whether horse-drawn transportation was less or more dangerous than automotive transport. I especially appreciate the links:

If you’d like to see some nineteenth-century horse-drawn vehicles in action, the Library of Congress offers video of traffic in New York’s Herald Square in 1896, near New York’s Dewey Arch in 1899, and on South Spring Street, Los Angeles, in 1897.

The 1905 film of Market Street in San Francisco, “before the fire,” takes a few minutes to load but is well worth the wait. In addition to horse-drawn vehicles, trolleys and pedestrians, it has cars and bicycles!

And you can see what Steamboat points out — how much smaller the streets become once you add in automobiles.

REO Mountaineer, New York to San Francisco and back

REO Mountaineer, New York to San Francisco and back

By 1905 cars far outnumber horses on San Francisco’s Market Street. In addition, the trolley traffic is much less frequent than appears to be the case in 1896 pre-automobile New York City.

Bicycles were a popular mode of transportation before cars — faster than walking, less involved and cheaper than a horse and buggy — but only a couple brave souls are seen pedaling on Market Street.

Thanks to Steamboats and The Library of Congress!

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Statue representing Fire at Department of Justice, close up of hand, circa 1920

Statue representing Fire at Department of Justice, close up of hand, circa 1920

(Photograph courtesy of The Library of Congress; Call Number: LC-H814- 2292-002) (more…)

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Esquimaux village, circa 1901 - Frances Benjamin Johnston, photographer (1864-1952)

Esquimaux village, circa 1901 - Frances Benjamin Johnston, photographer (1864-1952)


Shannyn Moore explains:

“In 1922, a Tlingit Chief, Charlie Jones was jailed for voting. His protest gave way to Native Alaskans getting the right to vote two years before Native Americans.

In 1944, years before the civil rights movement in the States, Roberta Schenck, a Native woman refused to budge from her seat in the “White’s Only” section of a movie theatre in Nome. She was dragged out and jailed. Schenck was Alaska’s Rosa Parks. Because of her bravery and the moving testimony of Elizabeth Peratrovich, on Feb. 16, 1945, Territorial Governor Ernest Gruening signed an anti-discrimination law. Against the argument that the law would not eliminate discrimination, Peratrovich said, “Do your laws against larceny and even murder eliminate those crimes?”

We decriminalized abortion before Roe vs. Wade. Our privacy laws are the strongest in the country.”

(Photograph courtesy of The Library of Congress)

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